Where do we go from here…

Listen to this post ...
I grew up being bullied by classmates, teachers, and even members of my own family.

I was beat up at various times from the age of 5 through middle school. I finally fought back, decisively, and no one touched me again after that.

To some, I should’ve acted sooner. In my mind, aggression and violence lack any and all moral authority.

Our leaders do a tremendous job of wrapping it in a pretty bow of patriotism or some other unquestioned tribalistic, dogma.

What they’re really saying is that, we have the resources and strength to force others to indulge our selfishness and tough shit if they don’t like it.

That isn’t leadership, those are grade school bullies who grew up to be elected by other bullies. There, I said it.

Please don’t come at me with talk of Hitler and other historical actors who could only be stopped through fierce opposition.

That is a symptom of the broader problem I’m talking about and not an exception of what I’m talking about here.

The fact that our movies, shows, media, YouTube, etc., glorify people getting hurt, maimed, beaten and even killed in the name of “justice” or entertainment should disturb everyone.

It would be like cows sitting back and watching slaughterhouse footage to unwind.

We need a new script. Our culture needs an enema.

People who live with neurodiversity know the experience of living in a world where people are hostile toward them simply because they’re different.

A sarcastic and judgmental, “What’s wrong with you,” is not uncommon when you act a little quirky around someone unfamiliar with you.

While we’re on the subject, “sarcasm” is an aggressive way of speaking. It’s tone suggests the person you’re talking to is stupid. It’s one-upmanship.

It’s one way we compete with each other and our culture is saturated with it.

This incessant need to win, be the smartest kid in the room, be the best whatever, causes us to put each other down at every opportunity and it needs to fricking stop NOW!

Each person needs to decide for themselves how they want to shape this world.

If violence plays any role in your plan, you’re part of the problem.

There’s a lot to learn from those who have led the way to profound social change without once raising their hand against a fellow human being.

Let’s try unity, connection, compassion, community and kindness for a while. It can’t be worse than what we’ve been doing.

Some great ideas for you

Listen to this post … It isn’t necessarily useful to be so attached to beliefs you currently believe most accurate. The universe is inherently playful and will usually challenge them regularly. I’ve learned over the years to share my thoughts with a spirit of “would you like to try this on”? Understanding that the beliefs you hold are

Read More »

When “I don’t know”, is your kid’s favorite answer

Listen to this post … “Why did you do that?” “I don’t know!” If you are raising a neurodiverse kid this is a familiar exchange. Few parents know where to go from here. Fortunately, I do. Einstein said, “It’s not that I’m smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.” Introspection doesn’t come naturally to the neurodivergent, especially when

Read More »

Can a single criticism crush you?

Listen to this post … Ever felt criticized for saying something in the wrong “tone”? In your mind you knew it wasn’t a big deal. A misunderstanding, easy enough to correct. But seemingly out of nowhere you find yourself sobbing and feeling worthless. It’s like that one criticism reminded you of how it felt every time you

Read More »

A skill your neurodiverse child must have

As the mother of a Neurodiverse child, one skill you want your child to have is proactivity. It’s difficult to teach if your child struggles with task initiation, future thinking, anxiety. Here’s the gremlin to focus on to help remove the psychological barriers to taking charge of their life. Common statements like: “I forgot”“You didn’t tell me to”“You didn’t

Read More »

How do you feel about change?

Listen to this post … One assumption many parents and professionals make is that people with Neurodiversity aren’t motivated to improve their lives. It isn’t that they don’t want to change, they may not believe they’re able to change. They often have difficulty finishing what they start or getting started at all. Struggle with creating

Read More »

Thoughts on setting boundaries and sticking to them

When learning to set boundaries it can feel uncomfortable to do. Like breaking in a pair of new shoes. You have to walk around in them for a while before they feel natural.You may even feel like you’re being mean to others you’re setting boundaries with. Especially because many of them will say so.It’s important

Read More »
%d bloggers like this: