I can’t snap out of “ADHD” and it hurts to ask me to

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Telling someone to “snap out of it” when it comes to their ADHD is one of the most hurtful things a spouse can say.
 
I read a post from a young wife this morning struggling to explain her challenges to her husband while awaiting final diagnosis for ADHD.
 
Of course many parents have shown similar resistance to their child’s diagnosis. So what gives?
 
👉 Is it fear your loved one will be considered different?
👉 Fear YOU failed if you can’t fix it?
👉 Afraid how it’ll make YOU (the partner look)?
 
Maybe it’s fear about your partner/child?
 
👉 Does it put them at increased risk in the world?
👉 What if I’m not up to this as their spouse/parent?
👉 What if I screw up and make things worse?
 
All kinds of things go through a person’s head when someone they care about is given a diagnosis.
 
Some of it can appear selfish on the surface. Some of it may be protective for a mind having difficulty grasping its role may be about to change dramatically.
 
Some of it can be old fashioned helplessness when faced with a big unknown.
 
Both sides require patience, understanding and honest communication about your hopes and fears.
 
If in the end if you’re able to work together – you win.

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Listen to this post … One assumption many parents and professionals make is that people with Neurodiversity aren’t motivated to improve their lives. It isn’t that they don’t want to change, they may not believe they’re able to change. They often have difficulty finishing what they start or getting started at all. Struggle with creating

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Thoughts on setting boundaries and sticking to them

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Getting things done when you don’t know how long it’ll take

Listen to this post … One of the challenges with time blindness is when you have a long to do list. It can be anxiety inducing because estimating how long it’ll take you is a shot in the dark. I don’t feel time passing unless I have a clock or clouds to watch, something that tells

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Nipping IMPULSIVITY in the bud!

Listen to this post … Not thinking before blurting out an embarrassing comment. Doing things that upset others as a matter of habit, only to regret them later. The seeming inability to learn from any of this is a hallmark of ADHD. I used to get in so much trouble because of this. The reason for impulsivity

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When a neurodivergent person seems controlling, they may just feel unsafe

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Movement can be help you work through your emotions

Listen to this post … One of the best reasons to include movement breaks into your schedule is because movement plays an important role in relieving stress. Feeling trapped is a hallmark of a traumatic experience or an anxiety attack. Feeling like you can’t fight or flee. An example might be a child who is having severe

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