Public education policy is biased toward the needs of the able bodied

I’m hearing from mothers of young children who are being told about how their children need to learn to control their behavior, especially touching other children.

That’s it! The problem isn’t framed as a child acting in a way that demonstrates their own needs aren’t being met followed by asking questions about how to better support this child.

The frame is, this child must not bother other children.

REALLY! That’s the problem????

The problem isn’t that you expect a child who’s brain doesn’t produce enough dopamine to inhibit impulsive action, a child who’s best strategy to get the dopamine is movement and you bend over backward to deny them that and wonder why there’s an issue?

Wake up and smell the bullshit!

This isn’t the fault of the teacher either who is already juggling chainsaws to feed a bureaucratic beast that wants more and more for itself and less for the students.

Solution? We need parents, teachers and members of the special needs community involved in policy decisions at every level of government, from the school board up to the president’s cabinet and we must fight for this.

I’ve spend a lot of time over the years talking with administrators when I see inflexibility in the way things are done to educate my child(ren).

Teachers have less say about what happens in their classroom than you may realize.

They usually have to answer to someone with more authority, higher status and a bigger ego than can fit in the average classroom.

Of course not all administrators are like this, many are hands on partners with the teachers.

But where egos bloom students and teachers suffer, that MUST change. Put people in positions of authority who aren’t corrupted by it. When they are, don’t promote them, toss em out.

The future of our children is too high a price to pay for maintaining the status quo.

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