I’m afraid to tell you I’m confused

What will others think if I tell them I’m actually confused when they all seem to know what’s going on?

We can be hanging out together like always and suddenly I feel disoriented and nothing makes sense. It can even be a little scary.

This, or something like it, happening is a common fear of people with neurodiversity. Sometimes there are many conversations happening at once. Some folks talk fast.

Any number of things can overload your brain circuits and cause a temporary short circuit.

Sometimes my brain can keep up but sometimes it doesn’t kick in. Your brain can be like that unreliable car you have to push to get it started.

If only you knew when those times were going to be. Alas, they’re unpredictable. You may fear others discovering your vulnerability.

If you have this fear often one thing to consider is your social circle.

Nit picky, teasing, trash talking types may be less likely to express empathy and extend you grace during these moments.

People who themselves are more accepting of their own mistakes. Those who handle disappointment with flexibility instead of anger. These are the people you want around you.

There’s a reason swimmers choose water instead of oil. The environment you put yourself in to try and be your best matters.

It’s difficult to meet your needs and be at your best when hanging with people you don’t feel safe enough with to ask for what you need.

A few things to consider. Your current circle may have no idea of your struggles and may surprise you.

You could take a chance and speak up to see if they step up.

If they don’t, you take the necessary steps to bring new people into your life to add more water to your pool.

The answer should never be a life of keeping your needs to yourself because of a lack of those who understand.

Self-care is about more than getting enough rest

Listen to this post … Self-care isn’t simply about taking care of the parts of you that take care of everyone else. It’s about so much more.  It’s about taking care of the “self”, who you are, what fills you up and makes you feel most alive.  I focus on the self-care that strengthens the

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Where do we go from here…

Listen to this post … I grew up being bullied by classmates, teachers, and even members of my own family.I was beat up at various times from the age of 5 through middle school. I finally fought back, decisively, and no one touched me again after that.To some, I should’ve acted sooner. In my mind,

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When you don’t know how to figure out what isn’t working…

Listen to this post … You don’t need to have resolutions or goals because there’s a new year. Whether you live your life guided by a desire to be, have or do anything is up to you. Regardless of what the calendar says. Your beliefs about what’s possible for you may be informed by how much neurodiversity

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Robbing stigma of its oxygen

“Telling your story of life with neurodiversity educates and robs stigma of its oxygen.” I said something to that effect during a discussion about neurodiversity in the workplace this morning. The question was raised about how to educate employers about differences. I emphasized that it needs to start outside the companies, in our communities and

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You have to face a fear to get past it

Listen to this post … I’ve been feeling crippling anxiety over the past few weeks and I couldn’t quite get to the bottom of it. It was such a departure from my typical silver lining, be here now self. Last night I decided to allow myself to see what I was hiding from. I told the anxiety

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Follow your own stream when mainstream doesn’t fit

Listen to this post … As a neurodiverse person, your very existence is a challenge to the status quo. Many will be frightened by your differences, threatened by any disruption to their own comfort. Some will try to help you be normal, to fit in. To please others so you’re more likely to be accepted. Then there are

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