My disability has a lot to do with you too. . .

Listen to this post ...

Able bodied people don’t have a friggin clue how difficult it is for us to do the little things, let alone the complicated, multistep things.

“It’s all mind over matter,” they say.

“You have to let go of those limiting beliefs, you can do anything you set your mind too,” they claim.

Each person has their own unique talents and skillset. Talents can be refined and become skill. Skill can be learned, talent cannot.

It’s the epitome of arrogance to suggest your skills, rooted in your talents are easy to acquire and anyone who doesn’t work to develop them has a mindset defect as the primary reason they don’t.

Part of my struggle in this world results from those who keep telling me to learn to do myself, the things I have no talent or energy for.

I eat healthy, I take supplements to make sure my body has what it needs and yet I remain disabled.

Too many people can’t get their minds beyond the belief that if other people’s bodies or minds don’t work as theirs do, then a fix must be implemented so those poor, broken souls can be like me.

This can make for a lonely life. Especially when you think you finally found people who get it, just to find out they’re as committed to their ignorance as everyone else.

Mindset doesn’t cure disability, though it can help you endure it.
If you want to help people like me, offer your talents, don’t criticize us for not being able to do what comes naturally to you.

At least develop enough self-awareness to realize the only experience you can relate to is your own.

Then trust us when we tell you we are unable to do something the way you do, if at all.

This isn’t scarcity thinking, it’s accepting that our parameters for engaging the world are more restricted.

We bust our assess working to accomplish what we can with what we have. Only to have you think it isn’t enough because it isn’t like you do it. As much as I enjoy your company, your ignorance is too painful to endure.

As is your lack of respect for the reality of my situation.

Many of us end up on disability because instead of helping us we’re blamed for not trying harder.

I wish I could help people understand. Perhaps then we’d get the help we need from members of the community we thought we belonged to.

%d bloggers like this: