Helping someone can really help you heal

It’s been said that the best way to deal with your own problems is to help someone else with theirs. I think this is true and here’s why.

  • It reminds you that it isn’t all about you.
  • It reduces your feeling of isolation because you’re reminded other people have problems too.
  • AND, there’s a strong likelihood you’ll catch yourself dispensing the very wisdom you need to hear yourself.

We are social creatures and it seems to me that this is one way we heal by engaging our community.

By helping others, myself included, I find I tend to offer help to people having the same or similar problems to me.

As such our conversations tend to have themes (e.g. trust, vulnerability, boundaries). Each time I notice a theme- I do some reflection.

Only to discover that I’ve been subconsciously asking myself a question for which the answer has been elusive.

The advice I give can be the answer I was looking for but wasn’t ready to act upon myself, or I’m offering options to others in search of the one I want to try.

Our peers are part role model, part sounding board and sometimes they’re our testing ground. If it works for them maybe I should try it as well.

You see, you don’t solve problems alone as much as you think you do.

Every time you reach out to help someone else you have the opportunity to heal a little more.

Every time you reach out to help you create an opportunity for two (at least) to experience healing.

  • You can share the lessons of healing you’ve already experienced.
  • You can offer to take on a challenge together and support each other through the ups, down and epiphanies.
  • You can simply be there so they don’t feel alone.

Heck, you can be there so you don’t feel alone.

For people with ADHD or other challenges, the right relationships can mean the difference between inclusion and isolation.

Relationships are so powerful and so healing. Aren’t they?

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