Taking meds for ADHD doesn’t have to change who you are

Many youth and adults with ADHD resist the idea of medication to manage the challenges ADHD can create.

Meds are historically associated with the treatment of illness, an infection you want to get rid of.

Mental illness, as a result, is so stigmatized in our culture the mere idea one may need to treat something mentally through medication can result in great fear and shame.

Though ADHD isn’t considered a mental illness, the idea of meds for treatment can make it appear so.

“There’s nothing wrong with me,” or “I’m not crazy” are common reactions.

What this expresses is, “My brain is me!” “If I take a medication for my brain it means something is wrong with me!” “I don’t want to change me!”

If I’ve learned anything it’s that my brain isn’t me. My brain is what helps bring me into the world. It learns language, remembers people and important things about them.

It reminds me of the values that connect with my spirit so I can live those values consistently. The better I can live my values the greater the impact I can make on the world.

If my brain or anything else results in me being inconsistent and unreliable. I’d like to do something about it.

I don’t take meds but my sons do and the results are miraculous. I use meditation and mindfulness to manage my ADHD.

The point here is to put greater importance on the results you want to create instead of protecting the mistaken belief that who you are rests solely in your brain.

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